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The Somerton Man Case. The body of a man found on an Australian beach close to a major Atomic Testing ground, he was probably poisoned, a copy of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam and an unbroken Code page found and associated to him. Set against a Cold War background in 1948, was this man a spy? We think so and this blog focuses on the evidence that was left behind and in some cases missed, the Code page, Dry Cleaning numbers, A Poem and a small, torn piece of paper bearing the words TAMAM SHUD.

Thursday, 25 May 2017

SOMERTON MAN: FBI FILE DOCUMENT SHOWS LIST OF SPIES< FEDOSIMOV INCLUDED




SOVIET SPY LIST UNCOVERED





This document was found by researcher Clive in an FBI archived file. It contains a list of known Soviet agents or, to be more precise the names of agents who had photographs in a 'Spy Album'.

You will notice the date shown is 1959 and also that the list contains the name of Pavel Ivanovich Fedosimov.

The question is, does this mean Fedosimov was alive in 1959? The document doesn't actually say that, it talks about an informant being shown photographs of individuals from a Soviet Intelligence Album. No dates are supplied for any of the named spies. Having said that, we have to be cognisant of the fact that Pavel's photograph was shown, which could mean that the FBI didn't know whether Pavel was still alive or that they knew otherwise. I have made a start on seeing if we can find any further information of the others on the list. It could be that one or more of them was no longer around in 1959.

Another name of interest within the list is Jurgen Kuczynski, this man was introduced to Klaus Fuchs by a fellow internee, Hans Kahle, it was Jurgen that then introduced Fuchs to the GRU.

The more I read of the various intelligence services and of the missions and methods employed, the more I understand that there were and are no rules. Spies did change names and descriptions, a good example of that could even be the photograph that we have of Pavel at La Guardia airport in 1947, was not really Pavel. We have to take the word of Pravda that this was indeed him.

For the record, thanks to Clive's digging, we have found articles about Pavel appearing at meetings in Denver and Chicago in the period pre 1947 as a guest speaker for American /Russian Friendship organisations. Sadly and once again, no photographs were published with those articles. Those appearances raise the question of what else was this named Russian Spy was doing in Chicago and Denver. Then again, that's not a question to pursue at this time, maybe down the track it will have some relevance.

Many thanks Clive!

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Hi Gordon, Just a pity that the FBI don't give any more definite data on this listing of agents. It could well be that the 'Soviet Intelligence Album' was initiated in the late 1940's when the FBi realised the Soviet diplomats job description also included spying. Therefore, It could have been about 10 years old or more, which doesn't help us! Certainly, it's a mite odd that Fedosimov went to various meetings within the USA, yet no photographs have surfaced, perhaps the Soviet Embassy had a say in the outcome? CliveT